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Kms Miles
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Alaska State #9 Highway Guide

Miles Kms Item Summary
0.0
0.0
City of Seward Alaska
Historic city of Seward, Gateway to the Interior and Kenai Fjords Alaska National Park and southern terminus of the Alaska Railroad. The historic Iditarod Trail begins at the waterfront in the downtown district where the city docks stood prior to the catastrophic 1964 earthquake. From this terminal was also the beginning of the privately-owned Central Alaska Railroad which eventually was owned by the federal government and now a corporation owned by the State of Alaska and named the Alaska Railroad.
2.5
4.0
Junction of Nash Road
Nash Road leads to the Seward Shipyards and Industrial Center as well as to Spring Creek Correctional Facility, a state prison.
3.0
4.8
Junction of Hermann Lierer/Exit Glacier Road
A seven-mile paved road leading to Exit Glacier, the only land access to the Kenai Fjords National Park. A ranger station, parking and interpretive signs lead to an easy walk to the face of the glacier. Kenai Fjords National Park: Sweeping from rocky coastline to glacier-crowned peaks, the park encompasses 607,805 acres of unspoiled wilderness on the southeast coast of Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. It is capped by the Harding Icefield, a relic from past ice-ages and the largest icefield entirely within U.S. borders. Visitors witness a landscape continuously shaped by glaciers, earthquakes, and storms. Orcas, otters, puffins, bear, moose and mountain goats are just a few of the numerous animals that make their home in this ever-changing place where mountains, ice and ocean meet.
4.5
7.2
Scott St. junction
Turning west on Scott St. and go about one mile to location marked as Lost Lake Trailhead. This is the southern end of the trail to Lost Lake. This is one of the most popular hiking trails and has fantastic vista views to the south, east, and north. Lost Lake is about 7.5 miles from the trailhead. Continue on northward from the lake about 8 miles to the northern trailhead at Primrose.
6.0
9.7
Historic Woodrow Siding
An important siding in years past to serve the growing community north of Seward by railway in the 1920's when only wagon trails existed. (Picture available.)
9.0
14.5
Entering Chugach Alaska National Forest Park
This large national park is used extensively by recreationalists in both winter and summer. Hiking/skiing trails abound. The Chugach surrounds glacier-filled Prince William Sound and is close to Anchorage, Alaska's largest city. The Tongass includes the many forested islands of Southeast Alaska and surrounds the cities of Ketchikan, Sitka and Juneau, Alaska's capital.
11.0
17.7
Ski Trail

12.0
19.3
Rest stop at Snow River valley
This pullout to the east provides a breathtaking view of the valley looking eastward toward the glaciers hanging on Paradise Peak Mountain.
13.0
20.9
Grayling Lake Alaska Trail
Another of the popular hiking trails groomed by the forestry service. Parking on both sides of the highway. Recreational Opportunities: The meadows along the trail offer highbush cranberries. Fishing for Grayling.
14.0
22.5
Snow River Railroad Underpass
If you are fortunate to be here about 10 am or 7 pm, you may catch the Alaska Railroad passenger train crossing the beautiful Snow River.
14.5
23.3
Wildlife viewing platform
A limited parking area allows access to a platform reaching out over a typical, small lily pond.
16.5
26.6
Snow River Hostel
Privately operated hostel opened to the public.
17.3
27.8
Junction with Primrose Road
Approximately 2 miles to Primrose State Campground. Primrose is a historic gold mining area. There are still active claims in the area. The beautiful boomarang-shaped Kenai Lake begins at the mouth of Snow river.
18.5
29.8
View pullout to the west
The first northbound view of Kenai Lake for photography buffs. (Picture available.)
19.0
30.6
Junction of Alaska Nellie Lawing Road
Alaska Nellie's home is a historic site in the area. It is a Bed and Breakfast facility and rich in local history.
22.3
35.9
View pullout to the west.
Beautiful view of the easterly bend of Kenai Lake looking toward the Cooper Landing area beyond.
23.0
37.0
Kenai Lake Alaska Ranger Work Station
Just beyond the railroad crossing turn in the drive to the right for the work station.
24.0
38.6
Crown Point Community
Crown Point is an old community first settled by local gold miners and service providers.
25.0
40.2
Lower Trail Lake
A beautiful small lake from which a number of float planes operate to take lake fisherman in to areas accessible only by air.
28.0
45.1
Moose Pass Alaska
A community of about 250 with a number of services available to the traveler including a post office. The town sets on the western shores of Upper Trail Lake. At this point the Alaska Railroad line crosses from the west side of the Trail Lakes to the east side and heads north through Johnson Pass and away from the highway.
28.0
45.1
Moose Pass Alaska
A community of about 250 with a number of services available to the traveler including a post office. The town sets on the western shores of Upper Trail Lake. At this point the Alaska Railroad line crosses from the west side of the Trail Lakes to the east side and heads north through Johnson Pass and away from the highway.
29.5
47.5
Pullout and picnic area
On the shore of the Upper Trail Lake is a great picnic area and north view of the lake.
31.1
50.0
Point of Information
Crossing Yamerak Creek.
32.0
51.5
Pullout and restroom facilities
One of the few restroom facilities on the Highway.
32.5
52.3
Hatchery
Trail Lake Hatchery on the western edge of Upper Trail Lake raising smolt salmon.
33.0
53.1
Trail parking pullout
Parking near the trailhead for Carter Lake Trail. Excellent groomed trail which proceeds on from Carter Lake to Crescent Lake.
34.0
54.7
Goat Mountain community
Goat Mountain (local name) lies to the east side of highway. So called because of a number of goats can be viewed.
36.0
57.9
Junction with Sterling Highway Alaska
Highway 1 (Sterling Highway) turns to the east and joins the Seward Highway to the north. At this junction lies Tern Lake, a wildlife refuge area. Migratory birds, terns, gulls, geese, duck, and trumpeter swans can be seen here in the late spring and early fall.
39.4
63.4
Devils Pass Campground
This campground is to the west of the highway
45.0
72.4
Upper Summit Lake
Lying to the east of the highway, this lake is deep and fishing is near the shores. This is a very popular lake for snowmobiling during the winter. Lots of wildlife in the area.
45.5
73.2
Summit Lake Campground
Just beyond Summit Lake Lodge to the north is the marker and road into the campground which lies on the eastern shores of the lake.
46.0
74.0
Lower Summit Lake
This is the smaller of the two summit lakes. Some lake trout fishing is done on the north end of the lake.
46.5
74.8
Rest stop
The turnout to the rest stop is at the north end of the lake.
50.5
81.3
View pullout
A great view of the Canyon Creek valley lies to the north. To the West along this stretch of the highway, from about mile 40 to mile 50, are gold mining claims. Permission must be granted from claim owners to enter the claim areas.
51.5
82.9
View pullout
Scenic photography opportunities abound here. On the mountains to the east can be seen Dall Sheep. In the winter, venturesome skiers make the way up the slopes for downhill thrills.
53.0
85.3
Parking/rest stop pullout
Good parking lot for layover to explore the area.
53.5
86.1
View pullout
An interpretive sign provides historic information.
54.5
87.7
Parking/rest stop pullout
The pullout is to the east of the highway.
55.0
88.5
View pullout
The numerous pullouts along the highway are indicative of the reason the federal Department of Transportation has named the Seward Highway one of the fifteen Super Byways of America.
56.0
90.1
Junction with the Hope Cutoff
The Hope Road heads northwest into the communities of Sunrise Alaska and Hope Alaska. These were boom towns in the late 1800s and early 1900s as gold was being discovered in a number of locations. Gold mining claims exist in the area.
56.5
90.9
Canyon Creek Rest Stop
A large pullout with parking lies to the north (at this milepost the highway is running east-west until milepost 63 when it again turns to the north) and a smaller pullout is on the south side. Both pullouts have restrooms; the larger pullout is more popular as it has a great view of Dry Creek canyon as it runs north to Turnagain Arm. There are also numerous interpretive signs explaining the historic character of the confluence of two rivers. A six and one-half mile paved bike path begins here.
57.5
92.5
Rest Stop Pullout
The rest stop is to the north of the highway.
58.0
93.3
Rest Stop Pullout
This rest stop serves as a staging area for commercial rafting operations which operate on the East Fork of Sixmile Creek.
62.8
101.1
Campground
Granite Creek Campground provides a good camping area for local hiking and wildlife viewing.
63.0
101.4
Trailhead
Johnson Pass Trail into the Chugach Alaska National Forest provides groomed trail hiking. The paved bike path ends here. The highway turns here and heads north through Turnagain Pass.
65.5
105.4
Campground
Bertha Creek Campground to the west of the highway at the confluence of Bertha and Granite Creeks.
67.0
107.8
Pullout to the east
This is a popular parking area for local cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.
68.0
109.4
Rest stop with emergency telephone
One of the few places on the highway with emergency phone. These pullouts, one to the east and one to the west, have restroom facilities and are very popular staging areas for winter sports. NOTE: Mechanized vehicles are allowed only in the area to the WEST of the highway. Also, dangerous avalanches are possible during the winter/early spring.
70.0
112.6
Pullout
This pullout is to the east and is used for hikers, cross-country skiers going into the forest.
71.0
114.3
Pullout
This pullout is to the west and has a waterfall on the north end.
75.0
120.7
Signage
On the west of the highway is the welcome sign indicating the start of the Kenai Alaska Peninsula. At this milepost the highway turns to the east and begins to run along Turnagain Arm.
78.0
125.5
Junction with Portage Glacier Road
Turning northward again, the highway junctions with the Portage Glacier Road which goes to the east into the valley. At the end of this seven-mile road is a very good interpretive center educating the public on glaciers.
79.0
127.1
Wildlife Park
A privately operated wildlife park entrance is to the west of the highway. Fee required.
80.0
128.7
Railroad Depot
Passengers may board the train to Whittier from this depot.
80.5
129.5
20 Mile Creek
The highway turns to run in an east-west direction as it hugs the northern shore of Turnagain Arm. 20 Mile creek has a ramp area for boaters heading up the creek towards 20 Mile Glacier. This is also a popular area for hooligan fishing in the early spring.
86.0
138.4
Pullout
Small pullout at the boundary marker of the Chugach National Forest is on the south side of the highway.
90.0
144.8
Junction with Girdwood Road
All traveler services available at this junction. The road leads back to the resort community of Girdwood and the world-famous Alyeska Ski Resort. At the road junction is also the boundary marker for the Chugach Alaska State Park.
91.5
147.2
Turnagain Arm Pullouts (For the next 4 miles)
Along this stretch of Turnagain Arm are a number of pullout, all to the south (caution at all times when crossing on-coming traffic lanes to access the pullouts) and with interpretive signage. Bore tides are seen often along this route. Signage describes this as well as other interesting facts concerning Turnagain Arm.
96.5
155.3
Bird Point Rest Stop
The rest stop is on the south side of the highway.
100.0
160.9
Pullout
A two-mile paved bicycle path begins at this pullout.
101.5
163.3
Bird Creek Campground
The campground and rest area is split by the highway. Use caution through this area and watch for pedestrians.
102.5
165.0
Indian Creek Rest Stop
This rest stop is also to the south of the highway.
104.0
167.4
Junction with Indian Valley Road
An operating gold mine is at the end of the Indian Valley Road. The public is welcome.
104.5
168.2
View Pullouts (for the next 5.5 miles)
A number of pullouts lie to the south of the highway. Crossing on-coming traffic lanes are prohibited (signs are posted) at a some of these. Use caution where legal turns are made. Sheep and goat viewing to the north of the highway.
105.5
169.8
Falls Creek Trailhead
A popular hiking trail is to the north of the highway.
108.5
174.6
Rainbow Trailhead
Another good hiking trail to the north.
109.5
176.2
Beluga Point Alaska Pullout
Telescopes are at this pullout to view sea life and wildlife on the mountain sides. During the early summer months both beluga and orca whales can be seen following the salmon into Turnagain Arm.
111.5
179.4
McHugh Creek Park
Good parking area and an easy walk to the picnic areas of this very popular campground. USE EXTREME CAUTION WHILE HIKING THIS AREA. BOTH BROWN AND BLACK BEAR EXIST. HIKE WITH A BUDDY.
112.1
180.4
Point of Information
Crossing Jottahamma Creek.
115.0
185.1
Potter Creek Trailhead
A popular well-groomed trail with plenty of parking.
115.6
186.0
Chugach State Park Headquaters.
Ranger contact is available at the headquarters.
116.0
186.7
Potter Marsh
This wildlife refuge is a popular migratory bird viewing location. A boardwalk into the marsh with interpretive signage is at the north end of the marsh.
118.0
189.9
Welcome to Anchorage Sign
The downtown area is approximately three miles to the north. At this milepost the traveler is entering a limited access highway. Located in Southcentral Alaska on the shores of Cook Inlet, the Municipality of Anchorage is a unique urban environment situated in the heart of the wilderness. Russian explorers had established themselves in southern Alaska by 1784, but the English explorer Captain James Cook is credited with first exploring and describing the Anchorage area in 1778 during his third voyage of discovery. - e